Closed for September 30, National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Sales open October 2nd, regular hours resume October 3rd.

Closed for September 30, National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Sales open October 2nd, regular hours resume October 3rd.

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My vehicle smells weird. Should I be concerned?

My vehicle smells weird. Should I be concerned?

If your car smells bad, it might mean your vehicle needs a check-up. The smell could be coming from something that needs fixing. If you think the smell is coming from your car, ask an expert to take a look and see if they think it's time to visit the shop. Smells that might indicate a problem include burning rubber or plastic, rotten eggs, and sulfur. If you detect any of these smells in your car, it is important to get it checked out right away as they could be signs of an underlying issue. Additionally, if you detect an unusual smell and can’t quite put your finger on the source, there may still be cause for concern. Have a technician take a look just to make sure you don't have something serious going on with your car. Taking steps now can save time and money later.

But what do those smells mean? In short, it means get to a shop. If you want specifics, well here's some of the more likely culprits:

Smells... sweet? A sweet smell from your car likely indicates a coolant leak. This major issue can lead to overheating and potential engine failure if not addressed promptly. Yet, a coolant leak can usually be fixed easily, often with a simple hose replacement. Coolant and antifreeze are highly toxic to humans and animals alike. As they have a sweet smell and taste, they are especially dangerous to pets and young children. Therefore, spills should be cleaned up immediately.

What's burning? The common causes of a burning smell from your car include issues with the clutch, brakes, an electrical short circuit, or the car's heater. Improper use of the clutch can cause it to burn, emitting a specific paper-like smell. Overuse of brakes, especially when going downhill, or a seized caliper piston can lead to a burnt smell from the brakes. Electrical issues can result in melting or burning of the plastic around wires, connections, or fuses. Lastly, the heater can produce a burning smell due to dust, debris, or a malfunctioning heater core.

Smells like rotten eggs in here... If your car emits a rotten egg or sulfur-like smell, it could be due to one of three common issues. These include a leakage of transmission fluid, a malfunctioning fuel pressure sensor or fuel filter causing the catalytic converter to flood with oil, or a faulty catalytic converter itself. The latter could be clogged, malfunctioning, or overheating, leading to the emission of harmful sulfur gas. Regular maintenance as recommended by your car's manufacturer is crucial in preventing such issues.

Exhaust smell? If you detect an exhaust smell inside your vehicle, firstly rule out the possibility of it stemming from nearby cars. If the scent persists and it's clear the source is your vehicle, it's likely due to an exhaust leak - a problem that can occur anywhere within your vehicle's lengthy exhaust system. The timing of the smell might provide clues about the location of the leak; constant smell may suggest a problem near the front of the system, while an intermittent smell when idling could indicate a problem at the back. Regardless of the cause, an exhaust leak is a serious safety issue. It can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning, resulting in dizziness, confusion, and even unconsciousness. Therefore, avoid driving a car with such an issue and seek immediate professional assistance.

Gassy? (No not that kind...) Experiencing a gas smell in your car can be a sign of several issues, including a leak in your fuel system, problems with your fuel pressure regulator, or exposure to gas fumes. A gas leak, which can be identified by a puddle under your vehicle, is particularly dangerous as it can lead to fires. An issue with the fuel pressure regulator interferes with the fuel mixture, causing excessive gas burning, decreased fuel efficiency, and reduced engine power. Lastly, the smell of gas can also be due to exposure to gas fumes, especially if you recently visited a busy gas station. If the smell persists, it could indicate a serious problem.

Acidic? If your car smells like vinegar, it could be due to several reasons such as a battery acid leak, ozone emissions from the car’s electric air conditioner motor, or more harmlessly you may need to clean your interior a bit. The presence of mold or bacteria can also cause this smell, leading to potential health effects such as coughing, stuffy nose, itchy eyes, sore throat, fatigue, and skin irritation. To eliminate the vinegar smell, maintain good AC habits, regularly clean your car and its AC vents, and replace the cabin air filter regularly.

If you are wondering why a certain smell is coming from your car but cannot figure it out yourself, ask questions! Talk to a professional who will be able to tell you exactly what is going on and how best to fix it. Don’t wait until the issue gets worse before seeking help, otherwise you could be facing hefty repair bills or bigger problems down the line. Pay attention to smells in your car and take action as soon as possible to avoid costly repairs or more serious issues. Keeping up with maintenance and being mindful of any strange odors will keep your car running smoothly for years to come.

Note: Please note that this content does not constitute professional advice and should only be used as general information. If you suspect an issue with your car, please consult a professional technician for assistance. Thank you!

Categories: Service Tips and Info